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Empire State Bldg model Empire State Building
First cut out the large piece that will form the central section of the building. Fold and glue the end flap to create an open box. Make sure the corners are square and even. Don't fold or glue the top flaps or bottom flaps yet.

Next cut out the long piece that will form the interior of the central section. Fold the piece into a U-shape with the row of little windows facing the inside and the flaps folded back at a right angle.

Slide the U-shaped piece inside the box so that the rows of windows match exactly. Try test-fitting the piece before gluing it in place. Make sure the U-shaped piece fits snugly inside the box with its edges flush with the edges of the first piece, so that step #2 will go smoothly.

After the U-shaped piece is in place, fold down the top flaps and fold in the bottom panels to complete the central part of the tower. Before the glue is dry, look at the piece from several angles to make sure that all the corners are square and the piece is straight without twists or crooked edges.

Next cut out the piece with the long thin rows of windows. Be sure to score the folds for all the small corners at the top of the piece.

Glue the small tab at the top to connect the walls around and then fold down the roof, tucking the tabs inside the walls.

Then fold over the bottom panel and glue it inside the bottom part of the wall. Just like before, make sure the piece is glued straight and square.

Before gluing the thin piece inside the U-shape of the central part of the tower, make sure the parts fit together well. You may have to trim off a tiny edge of the interior piece if it does not fit perfectly. The rows of windows of both pieces should line up when they are correctly matched.

With a very small amount of glue on the edges, slide the interior piece inside the U-shape down the middle. Match up the rows of windows upwards and downwards. If necessary, use a blunt toothpick or similar tool to push the smaller piece inward or outward to position it in the center.


Cut out the mooring mast and roll it into a tight tube. If you'd like, you can substitute a round toothpick or bamboo skewer cut to the right length with the paper glued around it. Add the tiny circular roof to the top of the mooring mast.
Score and carefully cut out the pyramid-shaped base of the mooring mast. Glue the side tab to connect the side walls of the piece, and then after the glue is set, fold the top down, tucking the flaps inside. Then fold the sloping sides inwards and glue in place.
Cut out the two sides of the antenna and glue together. You can strengthen the antenna with a drop of cyanoacrylate super glue (see Tips) either before connecting the two pieces or after letting the assembled piece dry.
Add the mooring mast to the top of the base, then the four decorative wings to its four corners. Then add the antenna to the top.

Next, cut out the larger tier of setbacks for the sides of the tower. Score the folds and then cut out the squares marked by scissors symbols. Fold the piece into a box shape with the flap attached to the roof tucked behind the flaps attached to the sides.
Glue the two lower tiers to the base of the tower. Then assemble the smaller tier of setbacks in the same way and glue them in place near the top of the tower.
Assemble the short section with octagonal corners and glue it in place at the top of the tower. Assemble the small tiers for the sides of the tower and tuck them into the holes of the setbacks at the base of the tower. You can look inside the bottom of the tower to make sure these are glued in place correctly.
Finally, assemble the base of the model. Glue the tower in the center of the roof, then add the lowermost setback tiers. Last of all, add the mooring mast to the top of the building.

At last your model of the Empire State Building is finished! You can find a tiny model of the U.S.S. Akron and scale sized King Kong on the Extra Projects page.

Empire State Bldg model
Read more about the Empire State Building



Copyright 2013 Matt Bergstrom